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21st Century Democrats is proud to bring you AmericasDemocrats.org, the weekly netcast for stand-up Democrats that explores progressive perspectives on public policy, economic debates, foreign affairs and national politics. With regular contributors who include Texan populist Jim Hightower and provocative media commentator Bill Press, AmericasDemocrats.org seeks to become a salon of the nation’s most prominent Democrats. We're all about giving progressive Democrats tools you need to fight back against the Tea Party Republicans. So progressives, populists, liberals, Democrats and independents, sit back and listen -- then stand up and fight!

Apr 18, 2021

The powerful influence of Lady Bird Johnson. Confronting the myths about poverty in America. Plus, Bill Press with a behind the scenes account of Joe Biden’s election campaign.

 

Julia Sweig on her newest book Lady Bird Johnson: Hiding in Plain Sight. Mark Rank on his newest book Poorly Understood: What America Gets Wrong About Poverty. Plus Bill Press with journalists Johnthan Allen and Amie Parnes on how Joe Biden barely won the presidency.

Julia Sweig

In her new biography of Lady Bird Johnson, Julia Sweig reveals the unappreciated impact of a remarkable first lady during a historic turning point in American  politics.

Mark Rank

In his newest book, Mark Rank explores what we don’t understand about who gets poor and why, and how long-standing myths have damaged our ability to respond to the deepening crisis of inequality in America

Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes

And now, Bill Press with journalists Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes on Joe Biden’s nail-biting campaign to take the White House, and how luck won out in the end. If you'd like to hear the entire episode, visit BillPressPods.com. 

Jim Hightower

Monopoly Is What’s For Dinner

 

No longer just a parlor game, monopoly is what’s for dinner. Practically every commodity and every step in producing our families’ most essential consumer purchase is in the tight grip of four or fewer global conglomerates:

 

Four chemical giants control more than two-thirds of the world market for commercial